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is to foster an environment where sexual assault is not tolerated, condoned or ignored. we must have a climate of dignity and respect with where where a victim's report is taken seriously x they're provided resources. commanders or and leaders across the armed forces play an essential role in establishing this climate where victims supported, and they do not fear retaliation, where offenders know they will be found and held accountable and where bystanders are motivated to intervene. our troops take care of each other on the battlefield, the same ethos of care must extend to combating sexual assault. commanders are responsible for the good order and discipline of the forces under them. this is essential to military readiness and mission success. removing commanders from the administration of military justice would undercut their ability to establish good order and discipline in their units and undercut their authority especially in combat where the uniform code of military justice is most tested by the stresses of war. the department has undertaken a variety of initiatives to strengthen our ef
in the political environment where each participant has multiple constituencies to which they're accountable in some fashion and paying attention to. and so you take the last few days, clearly in a state of play that involves positioning, and we can be critical, it's easy to be create -- critical about why that's kind of the reaction everybody always has in a labor dispute. why can't they just get in the room? they know the range of substantive outcome. it's not a secret, it's not hard to find, why can't they do it this afternoon? and similarly, observing events in the fiscal negotiations, everybody looks at it and say, well, why can't they get those four or five people around the table in the roosevelt room this afternoon and resolve it? the subsequent outline has always been there, it's been this in every private conversation with maul groups of members -- with small groups of members of congress from both sides. it's not elusive. the details can be complicated especially on issues like health care costs, but the broad outlines of a resolution of these problems are not hard or to define, a
for political instability perhaps has increased, amplified by the deteriorating economic environment that chavez will also bequeath to his successor. so what happens next? are there some scenarios that are more likely than others? what are the implications for vens venezuela and also the international community, and what is the chavez legacy for the region? we've assembled a top flight panel, each of the panelists having deep experience in and knowledge of venezuela. our first panel cyst is russell dallen -- panelist is russell dallen. was is a journalist through and through having worked for a firm of leading publications around the world, a keen observer of the issues. he's also an effective commentator, and his views are widely sought by the press and the markets. any of you of who have followed venezuela recently have probably seen his name pop up in some of the press articles. russ is a harry suspect truman scholar which is something i like to point out whenever i can. second is charles shapiro, formerly the u.s. ambassador to venezuela. charles recently which canned a very successful tenur
a period of time begins to impact on the environment and on people. and so that's when you get into agricultural drought, hydrologic drought, and there's another type of drought sometimes referred to which is more socioeconomic drought, which is kind of a supply and demand thing, so there gets to be a lot of confusion sometimes between what is an agricultural drought and what is at hydrologic drought. in the minds of the public eye which is a also in the minds of some researchers and scientists speed roger, you live right there in colorado, quite a few months out of the year so you in a state that's got the perfect case study. i think he wanted to make a comment on that? >> so from the standpoint of the state of colorado, one of the things, and other states that don has mentioned them is the idea of linking the drought plan to the other planning mechanis mechanisms. the links between the drought plan and the water resources plan in many cases are very tenuous. one of the few states that's actually trying to make a link between long-term use of the aquifer and its drought plan,
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4